Goodnight Moon does two things right away: It sets up a world and then it subverts its own rules even as it follows them. It works like a sonata of sorts, but, like a good version of the form, it does not follow a wholly predictable structure. Many children’s books do, particularly for this age, as kids love repetition and the books supply it. They often end as we expect, with a circling back to the start, and a fun twist. This is satisfying but it can be forgettable. Kids — people — also love depth and surprise, and “Goodnight Moon” offers both. Here’s what I think it does that is so radical and illuminating for writers of all kinds, poets and fiction writers and more.

—In a wonderful essay from NYT’s Draft series, Aimee Bender considers what writers can learn from the beloved 1947 children’s book Goodnight Moon. Pair with what editors and mentors can learn from the great Ursula Nordstrom, the legendary children’s book editor responsible for Goodnight Moon as well as other children’s classics like Where the Wild Things Are, Charlotte’s Web, and The Giving Tree. (via explore-blog)


“An entry from the diary of a young Charlotte Brontë recalls a stormy night and is ‘crazily compressed into nearly microscopic print.’”

“An entry from the diary of a young Charlotte Brontë recalls a stormy night and is ‘crazily compressed into nearly microscopic print.’”

(Source: smalljoys)

Since dedicating myself to getting into “superhero shape,” several articles regarding my weight have been brought to my attention. Claims have been made that I’ve been on a strict workout routine regulated by co-stars, whipped into shape by trainers I’ve never met, eating sprouted grains I can’t pronounce and ultimately losing 14 pounds off my 5’3” frame. Losing 14 pounds out of necessity in order to live a healthier life is a huge victory. I’m a petite person to begin with, so the idea of my losing this amount of weight is utter lunacy. If I were to lose 14 pounds, I’d have to part with both arms. And a foot. I’m frustrated with the irresponsibility of tabloid media who sell the public ideas about what we should look like and how we should get there.

Scarlett Johansson for the Huffington Post [x]

More of her brilliant articles can be found here.

(via theshadowsinthesun)

(Source: ramblingraconteur)

staff:

mymanisaloser:

Welcome to my Dashboard Confessions

What you learned about John Stamos while deflowering him with Asks:
He doesn’t especially mind being called “Uncle Jesse.”
He has a crush on Don Rickles.
He has an outie. Ponder that, will you? 
He dares you to find him. 
He wonders if you are ovulating. 
Find out more about this hunk-and-a-half and his new movie by following mymanisaloser. 

staff:

mymanisaloser:

Welcome to my Dashboard Confessions

What you learned about John Stamos while deflowering him with Asks:

Find out more about this hunk-and-a-half and his new movie by following mymanisaloser

theimpossiblecool:

“Never interrupt someone doing something you said couldn’t be done.” 
Amelia Earhart. 

theimpossiblecool:

“Never interrupt someone doing something you said couldn’t be done.” 

Amelia Earhart. 

who-let-the-daleks-out:

thenerdgirlcometh:

I actually believe artists and scientists think very similarly. Complex, abstract thought? They both have that down. It’s all about where that thinking takes you after that.

Words cannot describe how much I love this post.

(Source: ucresearch)

  • Comic Con: knock knock
  • Me: who's there
  • Comic Con: not you lol
digg:

Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

digg:

Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

kingsleyyy:

netflix gives u 15 seconds between episodes to decide whether or not you’re doing anything with ur life today